Last edited by Kagadal
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Anthracite mining and utilization found in the catalog.

Anthracite mining and utilization

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications.

Anthracite mining and utilization

hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, June 9, September 4, October 2, 1980.

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications.

  • 39 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Pennsylvania.,
  • Northeastern States.,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Anthracite coal -- Pennsylvania.,
    • Anthracite coal -- Northeastern States.,
    • Energy policy -- United States.

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKF27 .S3934 1980i
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 518 p. :
      Number of Pages518
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3919742M
      LC Control Number81600964

      In spring , John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over million tons in Mining Anthracite. Anthracite was first quarried from outcrops. When quarrying became impractical, the miners went underground. When the geology and topography would permit, access to the coal beds was obtained through horizontal tunnels (adits, drifts) which also .

      The book is comprehensive, dealing first with reserves of anthracite and with related petrography. Culm – anthracite waste – features frequently in the book. Actual and projected anthracite mining are discussed in turn and exploration also has its due place. Anthracite is most commonly used in domestic fuel, in either hand-fired stoves or automatic stoker furnaces. Anthracite coal is the most economical fuel for supplying heat and hot water today. Fine anthracite particles are used as filter media, and as a constituent in charcoal briquettes.

      - The COAL HOLES Anthracite’s Independent Mining Families. At the turn of the last century, advancing technology began to bring about the system of consolidated breakers: Large and more efficient coal processing plants would collect trains of mine-run coal from surrounding sites into a centralized location for rock removal, sizing, and washing; and then build large . Anthracite coal miner Summary Photographs show Andrew Scavnicky of Hazleton, Pa., at work and with his family. The miner adjusting his carbide lamp, changing his clothes, riding in the man car, placing a blasting charge, etc. Also, general views of the countryside. Contributor Names.


Share this book
You might also like
Batman

Batman

Pioneer families of Leslie County

Pioneer families of Leslie County

way of life

way of life

Margaret Tarrants Christmas garland

Margaret Tarrants Christmas garland

proverbs of MKO-Abiola

proverbs of MKO-Abiola

An anchor for the future

An anchor for the future

Warwick Castle

Warwick Castle

Quicksand

Quicksand

Loose on liquidators

Loose on liquidators

Town swamps and social bridges.

Town swamps and social bridges.

Transportation fuels--a crisis in supply, demand, price or policy?

Transportation fuels--a crisis in supply, demand, price or policy?

Anthracite mining and utilization by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Anthracite mining and utilization: hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S.

House of Representatives, Ninety-sixth Congress, second session, June 9, September 4, October 2, [United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. The Museum of Anthracite Mining is open from April 1 through Novem but visitors, including school groups, may visit by appointment during the winter months.

For information, write: Museum of Anthracite Mining, Seventeenth and Pine Streets, Ashland, PA ; or telephone () There lies before me a fat volume, of almost a thousand octavo pages, which might be called the "Book of Accidents." It is the report of the Bureau of Mines of the State of Pennsylvania for the yearand is made up of the reports of the inspectors of the eight anthracite and ten bituminous districts.

out of 5 stars Anthracite Railroads and Mining. Reviewed in the United States on October 7, Verified Purchase. Very good. It and it's companion book do a good job of covering the Anthracite coal mining areas in the Nor.

East Pa. Read 5/5(4). There are two types of coal found in Pennsylvania: anthracite (the “hard coal” found in Northeastern Pennsylvania below the Allegheny Ridge southwest to Harrisburg; also called “stone coal”, “rock coal” in the s) and bituminous (“soft coal”, found west of the Allegheny Front escarpment).Anthracite coal is a natural mineral with a high carbon and energy content that.

The mining tradition in Leonard's family spans five generations in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, home to some of our country's richest deposits of anthracite coal. His family's stories illustrate with touching candor the plight of many thousands of Coal Belt families who stood proud through years of watching their sons, fathers, and husbands /5(3).

Anthracite, also called hard coal, the most highly metamorphosed form of contains more fixed carbon (86 percent or greater on a dry, ash-free basis) than any other form of coal and the least amount of volatile matter (14 percent or less on a dry, ash-free basis), and it has calorific values near 35 megajoules per kilogram (approximat British thermal units per.

Anthracite is one of the four types of coal. Here’s a look at what it’s used for, as well as where it’s mined and which companies are mining it. There are four main types of coal, and each. Workshop on the Utilization of Coal as an Alternative to Petroleum Fuels in the Andean Region: Volume II: Contributed Papers () Chapter: Anthracite Briquetting: a Strategy for the Development of the Coal Mining Industry in Peru.

Anthracite is a hard and compact variety of coal that has the highest content of carbon amongst all types of coals. With fewer impurities & highest calorific value there is a global increase in anthracite’s demand which is escalating the anthracite coal mining market. Anthracite derives from the Greek anthrakítēs (ἀνθρακίτης), literally "coal-like".

Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal, dark coal, coffee coal, blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal or craw coal, and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand of anthracite, mined by the Glen.

Recycling Utilization Patterns of Coal Mining Waste in China Article (PDF Available) in Resources Conservation and Recycling 54(12) October. Anthracite Coal Region Examples. The most prevalent beneficial use of coal ash in the anthracite coal region (anthracite region) of Pennsylvania is the utilization of coal ash for backfilling and reclamation of active and abandoned pre-act strip mines, and the surface related subsidence of abandoned deep mines.

All of the anthracite used in the U.S. is produced domestically by American workers. Almost all of the nation’s anthracite is found in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

There are over seven billion tons of anthracite available for mining. It is a solidly proven fuel source and high carbon reductant that is widely available throughFile Size: KB.

The anthracite mining industry loomed over the region until its decline in the s. Strip mines and fires, most notably in Centralia remain visible.

Several violent incidences in the history of the U.S. labor movement occurred within the coal region as this was the location of the Lattimer Massacre and the home of the Molly : Jennie Levine Knies.

This wonderful book answers these questions with a case history of the anthracite coal industry. Anthracite is “hard” coal, formed under greater heat and pressure than bituminous or “soft” coal. Anthracite gives off less smoke when it burns than most bituminous coals, making it. Get this from a library.

Coal: the resource and its full utilization. [Chester G Gilbert; Joseph E Pogue; Smithsonian Institution.] -- The authors discuss the potential of coal and coal economics, touching on subjects like coal type (anthracite, bituminous, lignitic), coal mining, coal reserves, coke and munipical gas plants, etc.

A vintage silent film depicting a day in the life of a Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal miner. Mining Anthracite. Overview: Mining Anthracite. Coal deposits are scattered around the globe, but the coal from a square mile region of northeastern Pennsylvania is special.

During the Paleozoic era, million years ago, what is now rugged and mountainous terrain was a steamy plain filled with swamps. Tropical plants grew and died here. Establishments primarily engaged in producing anthracite or in developing anthracite mines.

All establishments in the United States that are classified in this industry are located in Pennsylvania. This industry includes mining by owners or lessees or by establishments which have complete responsibility for operating anthracite mines for others.

Books shelved as coal-mining: Gray Mountain by John Grisham, Fall of Giants by Ken Follett, Faith, Hope, and Ivy June by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, How Gre. Although I live in Philly, a part of American History that has always fascinated me was the story of anthracite coal mining, the miners, and their families in Pennsylvania.

The story includes the interesting aspects of the Molly Maguires, the Lattimer Massacre, the Phoebe Snow advertisements, the Strike ofthe Centralia Fire, etc.

The book synthesises all the possibilities of the organic petrology as a tool for coal utilization in conventional applications (mining and beneficiation, coal combustion, gasification, liquefaction, carbonization), as a precursor of carbon materials and as a 4/5(2).